Ultimate Singapore MRT Guide [With Current & Future MRT & LRT Maps]

Overview

The Mass Rapid Transit, MRT is the major component of the railway system present in Singapore. For quite a long time, it has been a more reliable and rapid transit system spanning most of the city-state in Singapore.

On November 7, 1987, MRT started off by creating railway connections lying between Toa Payoh and Yio Chu Kang. And on March 12, 1988, the MRT system was officially launched in the country to provide a system of rapid railway transportation. From that time, the network has since grown rapidly across the entire states in Singapore. The MRT system in Singapore has ever since been expanded.

At the moment, the MRT network connects cities with an overall network of about 124.0 mi (199.6 kilometers). In total, there are up to 119 stations in operation on a full standard gauge.

There are several MRT lines operating in Singapore. Each MRT network comes with its unique colors on the MRT route map making it quite easy for anyone to tell what MRT line it is. The various MRT networks include the following:

1. North-South line

The North-South line started operation on November 7, 1987. It is a high-capacity MRT line in Singapore having 26 stations with terminals located at Jurong East and Marina South Pier MRT station. It covers a total length of 45 kilometers (28 mi). The North-South line is operated by SMRT Trains with its control centre at City Hill halls and includes four depots such as Changi Depot, Bishan Depot, Ulu Pandan Depot and Tuas Depot. It runs with Red colors as can be found on the MRT map route map.

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This MRT line has been in operation since December 1987. It is operated by SMRT Trains running a total length of 57.2 kilometres (35.5 mi). The East-West line is a high-capacity MRT line in Singapore. There are a total of 35 stations with four depots, which includes Changi Depot, Bishan Depot, Ulu Pandan Depot and Tuas Depot. The East-West MRT line takes on a Green color as can be seen on the MRT map. Its terminus situated at Pasir Ris MRT station, Changi Airport MRT station, Joo Koon MRT station and Tuas Link MRT station.

The Circle line picks up the yellow colour on the MRT route map. It’s a medium-capacity MRT line in Singapore that commenced operation on 28 May 2009. The boasts of a high class terminal known as the Dhoby Ghaut MRT station, the HarbourFront MRT station and the Marina Bay MRT station. It has a total of 30 stations while covering a total distance of 35.5 kilometres (22.1 mi). The circle line has a single depot called the Kim Chuan Depot with its control centre located at the same depot. It is operated by the SMRT Trains.

The North East line is a high-capacity MRT line in Singapore. The line was established in June 20, 2003 with its control centre at Sengkang Depot under the operation of SBS Transit. This line operates with a purple color on the MRT map. It has a total of 16 stations and a single depot at the Sengkang Depot. The North East line stretches through a total distance of 20 kilometres (12 mi) with two terminals at HarbourFront and Punggol.

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The Downtown line is a medium-capacity MRT line in Singapore. This line is the latest MRT line to be established in Singapore. It commenced operation in December 22, 2013. It has about 34 stations, two terminals located at Bukit Panjang and Expo and three depots which are Kim Chuan Depot, Tai Seng Facility Building, and Gali Batu Depot. It is under the operation of SBS Transit with a control centre at Gali Batu Depot. The Downtown line takes on a blue color on the MRT map.

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Services and Facilities of Singapore MRT

All MRT lines are equipped with great facilities to ensure safety and security of life and properties of passengers.  For instance, a majority of the MRT lines are underground or elevated. The stations are constructed to be deep and hardened enough to withstand aerial bomb attacks.

The services are great at all MRT lines in Singapore. There is high-quality mobile network coverage offering both 3G and 4G services. The underground trains and stations are well air-conditioned, while there are ceiling fans installed in the above-ground stations.

Other services you can get in all MRT lines in Singapore include a Passenger Service Centre, General Ticketing Machines (GTMs), as well as plasma or LED displays that show train service information and announcements. More so, there are rest payphones and restrooms.

Some stations have additional services and other amenities, such as supermarkets, retail shops, and kiosks, convenience stores, automatic teller machines (ATM), as well as self-service automated kiosks where various kinds of services are provided. Heavy-duty escalators are present at every station to carry passengers up or down at a faster rate than other conventional escalators.

All stations in MRT line now barrier-free and wider AFC fare gates such as ramps, lifts and tactile guidance systems for the disabled and elderly. Much work is still going on to provide all stations with additional barrier-free facilities. Some stations have lifts at pedestrian overhead bridges installed as well as additional bicycle racks.

Hours of operation

All MRT lines operate from as early as 5:30 am to 1:00 am daily all through the year except in some holiday period such as New Chinese New Year, Deepavali, Year’s Eve, eves of some public holidays, Hari Raya, Christmas, and on some special occasions.

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Signaling

It’s quite interesting to note that some MRT lines are capable of having automatic train operation even without the intervention of an operator. The other lines such as North-South line and East-West line are the lines that are left out of this automatic signaling. They operate on fixed block signaling. This is a commendable development in signaling.

Presently, all MRT lines in Singapore use the CBTC Moving Block system in their normal daily operations. More so, all new MRT lines that were built since the North East line in the year 2003 had CBTC equipped in them right from the outset. They have the capability to be fully automated and driverless, thus requiring no form of onboard staffing. However, there is a means whereby operations are to be monitored remotely from the operations control center of the various lines. All trains are well equipped with intercoms to enable passengers to communicate with staff in emergencies.

The north-south line has a DTO level of automation with the Moving Block variation of CBTC. It was commissioned in the year 2017 and was supplied by Thales to provide SelTrac solution.

The East-West Line has also featured a DTO level of automation with the same Moving Block variation of CBTC similar to that of the North-South line. However, it was commissioned in the year 2018 and was supplied by Thales to provide the same SelTrac solution.

The North East line has a UTO level of automation with the Moving Block variation of CBTC. It was commissioned in the year 2003 and was supplied by Alstom to provide Urbalis 300.

Circle line has a UTO level of automation with the Moving Block variation of CBTC. It was commissioned in the year 2009 and was supplied by Alstom to provide Urbalis 300.

The downtown line, on the other hand, has a UTO level of automation with the Moving Block variation of CBTC. It was commissioned in the year 2013 and was supplied by Siemens, to provide Sirius CBTC.

Thomson-East Coastline is a new line that is to be commissioned in the year 2019. It is speculated that the line is going to come with the usual UTO level of automation (the Moving Block variation of CBTC). It will be supplied by Alstom to provide Urbalis 400 solution.

Depots

All MRT lines have several depots where trains are parked. For instance, the SMRT Corporation has four train depots. These include the Bishan Depot which is the central maintenance depot equipped with several train overhaul facilities, while two other depots such as Changi Depot and Ulu Pandan Depot house and inspect trains overnight. The fourth depot is the Tuas Depot which was built in the year 2016 for the East-West MRT line.

There is also an underground depot called the Kim Chuan Depot which houses trains for the Downtown line and the Circle line.

In addition, SBS Transit possesses two depots. One of it is the Sengkang Depot which houses trains for the North East Line, the Punggol LRT line and the Sengkang LRT line. The other one is called the Kim Chuan Depot which, at the moment is jointly operated together with SMRT for the Downtown Line.

Another depot that is worthy of note is the East Coast Integrated Depot. It is the world’s first four-in-one bus and train depot. The depot was built at Tanah Merah just a bit close to the original Changi. The depot site is to serve the Downtown, East West, and Thomson-East Coastlines. It has a capacity of housing 550 buses, 220 trains thereby integrating the depot for both trains and buses.

The main depot for the Jurong Region Line is situated at the western perimeter of Tengah. It offers an additional stabling facility to support the operations of the Jurong Region Line.

Also see: MRT Map

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Fares

Fares on all MRT lines are cheap and affordable to all and sundries. In other words, there is a contribution and support from are the government and other profit-based corporations. The fares are collected in a more sophisticated way by means of electronic data-storing tickets. Interestingly, the prices for each trip are calculated based on the distance between the point of departure and the destination stations. For this reason, fares are calculated in form of increments that are based on approximate distances between stations. This is more efficient and cost-effective when compared to the use of fare zones as it’s done in other subway systems.

More interesting is the fact that fares are under a strict regulation by the by the Public Transport Council (PTC). This provides a way of balancing the cost incurred in the use of any MRT lines in Singapore to ensure that it is overly affordable to everyone. This has helped in encouraging commuters. They are made to see the need for using the network thus, reducing the reliance on buses.

Ticketing

All MRT lines make use of a convenient ticketing system. This system incorporates the features of both the EZ-Link and the NETS FlashPay contactless smart cards. It allows ample opportunity for up to four card issuers. At any Passenger Service Centre or TransitLink Ticket Office, stored value EZ-Link or NETS FlashPay CEPAS card may be bought. Also, additional credit may be bought through either cash or NETS at any Add Value Machine, General Ticketing Machine (GTM), TransitLink Ticket Office, AXS Station, Passenger Service Centre, or online through a card reader that is purchased separately, or through selected merchants.

The CEPAS card can be used for the payment of LRT, MRT, and bus fares making it a form of universal commuter’s card. Also, the card could be used for the payment of goods and services at various merchants, Electronic Parking System car parks, and Electronic Road Pricing tolls.

There is a consideration for tourists who are visiting Singapore. There is the provision of a contactless smartcard called the Singapore Tourist Pass which is available for purchase. The card may be purchased at any TransitLink Ticket Offices as well as at the Singapore Visitors Centers. Funds deposited can be retrieved by returning the card to the visitors’ centers or ticket offices within five days of issue. However, there is usually no refund of any fund deposited if the card was used for journeys fewer than three. Your ticket may be used for the single or return journeys between selected stations to a maximum of six journeys over the duration of 30 days.

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Expansion

The Land Transport Authority (LTA) announced on January 17, 2013 that some feasibility studies were being carried out to build a station between Yishun and Sembawang stations. The feasibility studies were completed in the year 2014 and then Canberra station was built. Thereafter on August 1, 2014, LTA announced that construction would commence in mid-2015 and is expected to be completed in the year 2019. Actually, construction works for Canberra station started on March 26, 2016. This station is expected to serve as an infill station with side platforms and will be built along an operational section of the line between Yishun and Sembawang stations. The construction costs $90 million and will be completed in the year 2019 to serve upcoming developments around the station.  The station is expected to open in December 2019.

Canberra MRT station

For more than a decade, the MRT system has relied on its two main lines, the North South and East West lines, until the opening of the North East line in 2003. While plans for these lines and for those currently under construction were formulated long before, the Land Transport Authority’s publication of a White Paper with the title: “A World Class Land Transport System” in 1996 galvanized the government’s intentions to greatly expand the system.  It called for the expansion of the 67 kilometers of track in 1995 to about 360 in 2030. It was expected that daily ridership in 2030 would grow to 6.0 million from the 1.4 million passengers at that time.

On 17 January 2013, the existing line extensions and new rail lines were announced, superior to the announcement of the Land Transport Master Plan 2013.

The following lists the various Mass Rapid Transit lines and stations that are currently under construction, testing, or that is in the planning stages:

Downtown line

The Downtown line is a 44-kilometer station that is fully underground. It connects the eastern and north-western regions of Singapore to the new downtown that is located at Marina Bay in the south and to the CBD. Just like the Circle line, three-car train sets run on the Downtown line with projected line capacity for about 500,000 commuters daily. The Downtown line commenced operations that are spread across 3 stages. Stage 1 which was from Bugis to Chinatown and started operations on December 22, 2013. Stage 2 was from Bukit Panjang to Rochor which started operations on December 27, 2015. On October 21, 2017, Stage 3 commenced operations from Fort and while Stage 3e which is to be from Expo to Sungei Bedok will commence operations in 2024.

Thomson-East Coast line

The Thomson-East Coast line will be a 43-kilometer and a 31 station that will be fully underground. It hopes to connect the northern region of Singapore to the south while running parallel to the existing North South Line. It will pass through Woodlands, Sin Ming, Upper Thomson, and Marina Bay before bending towards the east and then run through Tanjong Rhu, Siglap, Marine Parade, and Bedok. Thomson-East Coast line will commence operation in five stages, out of which the first three stages will start from Woodlands North to Gardens by the Bay and begin operations between 2019 and 2021 respectively. Stage 4 will connect lines from Tanjong Rhu to Bayshore in the year 2023. Stage 5 will connect Bedok South to Sungei Bedok in the year 2024. It is also expected that the northern terminus of Woodlands North will interchange with the Johor Bahru–Singapore Rapid Transit System in other to provide access to Johor Bahru and later on the future Johor Bahru Rapid Transit System. The Land Transport Authority announced on August 11, 2017, that the Thomson-East Coast line will be the first new cashless line after the existing lines have been converted by the year December 12, 2018.

Proposed Extension to Changi Airport

In addition to the already announced alignment of the Thomson-East Coast Line, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) is studying whether or not to extend the TEL from Sungei Bedok station to the future Changi Airport Terminal 5, and then linking to the already existing Changi Airport MRT station on the East-West Line. This extension is important because, with it, there will be a direct connection between the city and Changi Airport. At the moment, the length of this extension is still being decided. If possible, this extension will commence operation in conjunction with the opening of the new Terminal 5.

Jurong Region line

The Jurong Region line was initially proposed as an LRT line at the time it was announced in the year 200. The 20-kilometer Line has since been upgraded to serve as a medium capacity line after the project was revisited in the year 2013. The new configuration will serve Tengah, West Coast as well as Choa Chu Kang and Jurong. More details are expected to come in once Tengah New Town development is up. The completion of the Jurong Region line has been estimated to be by the year 2025.

On May 9, 2018, it was announced that the line is to be of 24-kilometer long and with a total of 24 stations. It is expected to open in three phases starting from the year 2026 to 2028.

West Coast extension

It has been established already that there will be a West Coast Extension from the Jurong Region Line to the Circle Line is currently under study. This extension will help link the West Coast region directly to Pasir Panjang, thereby allowing commuters on the Jurong Region Line access the opportunity to access the central area of the city easily. If possible, the extension would be fully ready by the year 2030.

Cross Island line

The Cross Island line is a 50-kilometer line that is expected to span the whole island of Singapore. It will pass through Jurong, Tuas, Ang Mo Kio, Sin Ming, Punggol, Hougang, Changi and Pasir Ris. The addition of this new line will bring commuters with another sure alternative for East-West travel to the current Downtown line and East West line. Also, it will play a crucial role in Singapore’s rail network by connecting to all the other major lines to serve as a key transfer line, complementing the role currently fulfilled by the orbital Circle line. The Cross Island line will even have a longer time frame due to the environmental study aspects, with the completion by 2030. Also, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) has expressed interest in the implementation of possible express services on the CRL in future, apart from having just normal services. This express service would be of benefit to commuters during the morning peak hours as trains would only stop at the interchanges and skip the remaining stations, thereby, help in reducing travel time greatly.

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Circle line stage 6

The Circle line stage 6 is to be completed by the year 2025. The 4-kilometer extension is expected to run from Marina Bay through Keppel, ending at HarbourFront, effectively ‘completing the circle.’ On October 29, 2015, the LTA announced the locations of the 3 station for the ‘Circle line stage 6’. The stations are Cantonment, Keppel, and Prince Edward.

North East line extension

The North East line extension is to be completed by the year 2030. It will be a 1.6-kilometre extension that is expected to run from Punggol through Punggol North as well as the new Punggol Downtown. The extension is meant for future residents in Punggol North to have train access to the city center and to other parts of Singapore. It was announced by Second Minister for Transport Ng Chee Meng on June 7, 2017, that the North East line extension will open in 2023 instead, which is just a few years ahead of the proposed opening date. The single station extension will span 1.6 km and will serve the future Punggol North area. The station has tentatively been called the Punggol Coast. Construction work on the extension is expected to begin in the first half of 2018.

Safety on MRT Lines

Numerous measures had been put in place to ensure that there is the safety of passengers. In addition, SBS Transit has published the safety precautions on the driverless North East line before and after its opening. The safety campaign posters are almost everywhere in the trains and stations and are highly visible. Also, the operators often broadcast safety announcements to passengers and to commuters that are waiting for trains. There are fire safety standards that are consistent with the strict guidelines of the US National Fire Protection Association.

There were calls from different quarters pressing for the installation of platform screen doors at above-ground stations. The calls came in after the occurrence of several incidents in which passengers were killed by oncoming trains when they fell onto the railway tracks at above-ground stations. It is worthy of note that underground stations already has already featured platform screen doors since the year 1987. Although, the authorities initially rejected the proposal by casting doubts over functionality and concerns about the high installation costs, later on, there was a change in the decision when the government announced plans to install half-height platform screen doors on the above-ground stations in January 2008. These platform screen doors were first installed at Pasir Ris, Jurong East, and Yishun stations in the year 2009 under trials in other to test their feasibility.

By March 14, 2012, all elevated stations have already been retrofitted with the doors and are operational. These doors prevent were built to prevent suicides and unauthorized access to restricted areas. Some acts are highly prohibited under the Rapid Transit Systems Act. Such acts include eating, smoking, or drinking in trains and stations, the misuse of emergency equipment and trespassing on the railway tracks are illegal. Grave penalty awaits defaulters.

So far, there have only been a few major accidents in the history of the MRT that raised safety concerns among the public. On August 5, 1993, two trains collided into each other at Clementi station. The accident occurred because there was an oil spillage on the track, which resulted in 132 injuries. Also, on April 20, 2004, during the construction of the Circle line, a tunnel that was being constructed under Nicoll Highway collapse and this led to the deaths of four people. On November 15, 2017, two trains collided with each at Joo Koon MRT station, this lead to the injury of 2 SMRT staff and 36 passengers. More so, the case of incessant disruptions to the system of late has also raised concerns among the public, the cause of which has often being cited by a lack of maintenance together with increased ridership due to population growth.

Performance

Beginning with the major train disruptions on the North South Line in 2011, this single incident led to a Committee of Inquiry, which uncovered serious shortcomings in SMRT Corporation’s maintenance regime. For the December 2011 disruptions, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) imposed a maximum punishment of S$2 million on SMRT (approximately US$1.526 million) for the two train disruptions along the North South Line (NSL) on December 15 and 17, 2011. Thereafter, a Committee of Inquiry discovered shortcomings in the maintenance regime and checks, prompting then-CEO Saw Phaik Hwa to resign. Since then, every MRT line had been plagued with disruptions of various degrees of severity. And that became a major concern to most MRT Line users across the country.

As if that was not enough, a much larger power-related incident than the December 2011 event occurred on 7 July 2015, when train services on both the North South and East West lines were shut down in both directions following a major power trip. The disruption lasted for more than 3 hours, affecting 250,000 commuters. This was considered the worst disruption to the MRT network since it first began operations in 1987 – surpassing the December 2011 event. Independent experts from Sweden and Japan were hired to conduct an investigation into the cause of the disruption. After several investigations were carried out, it was later discovered that the cause was identified as damage to a third rail insulator due to a water leak at Tanjong Pagar station. Consequently, a program was implemented to replace insulators liable to similar failure. For the July 2015 disruption, LTA imposed a higher penalty of S$5.4 million on SMRT.

On March 2016 22, a more fatal accident occurred off Pasir Ris MRT station. Two of SMRT’s track-maintenance trainee staff were lethally run over by an approaching C151 at a signaling box of the station. They were part of a technical team of 15 staff led by a supervisor and were asked to go down to the tracks to investigate an alarm triggered by a possible signaling equipment fault close by Pasir Ris station. The operator said the team had permission to access the tracks but did not coordinate with a signal unit in the Pasir Ris station control to ensure train captains in the area where the team was exercised caution while pulling into Pasir Ris station. This unfortunate incident resulted in a 2.5-hour service delay between Tanah Merah and Pasir Ris Stations, affecting at least 10,000 commuters. However, all services were restored after the incidence.

Impact and criticism

While Singaporeans began to notice some issues with the MRT system in terms of overcrowding, the December 2011 disruptions brought the state of public transportation as a whole to national and international prominence. The overcrowding was brought about by an increase in patronage on MRT lines. LTA also noted a marked increase in dissatisfaction with public transport with the release of the 2012 Public Transport Customer Satisfaction Survey and promised government action to deal with issues relating to MRT and LRT disruptions.

The government reviewed the penalties for train disruptions and made travel free available for all bus services passing MRT stations affected during any train disruptions. Exits were also made free. Also in other to increase satisfaction with the public transport, a free morning off-peak travel was introduced while improvements are still on-going. This is important to encourage users to continue using MRT services.

Despite the several efforts that have been put in place to step up maintenance efforts, on 7 October 2017, a poorly maintained float and pump system at Bishan station caused a tunnel flood from a torrential rainstorm. That became the worst train disruption since the year 2011 and the first ever flooding incident in MRT history that lasted almost a day, thereby disrupting services underground. This incidence also resulted in further loss of public confidence and a huge debate among netizens and Singaporeans about the “high rankings” that manage the system, with calls being made for the resignation of Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan. Urban transport expert Dr. Park Byung Joon has once said that the negligence that was displayed by SMRT in this regard is tantamount to a criminal offense after an internal investigation found that the maintenance crew of the Bishan Station’s pump system had submitted maintenance records for nearly a year without actually carrying out the works.

Security

Initially, security concerns related to terrorism and crime were not high on the agenda of the system’s planners at its inception. However, after the Madrid train bombings in the year 2004 and the foiled plot to bomb the Yishun MRT station in 2001, the operators deployed private, unarmed guards to patrol station platforms and conduct checks on the belongings of commuters, especially those carrying bulky items.

In addition, recorded announcements are frequently made to remind passengers to report suspicious activity and not to leave their belongings unattended. Lots of digital closed-circuit cameras (CCTV) have been upgraded with recording-capability at all stations and trains operated by SMRT Corporation. Also, trash bins and mailboxes have been removed from station platforms and concourse levels to station entrances. This is meant to eliminate the risk of bombs planted in them. Photography without permission was also banned in all MRT stations since the Madrid bombings, but it was not in the official statement in any public transport security reviews.

On April 14, 2005, the Singapore Police Force announced plans to step up rail security by establishing a specialized security unit for public transport. The unit is known today as the Public Transport Security Command or more commonly called the TRANSCOM. These armed officers began overt patrols on the MRT and LRT systems on August 15, 2005, conducting random patrols in pairs in and around rail stations and within trains. They are trained and authorized to use their firearms at their discretion, including deadly force if deemed necessary. On January 8, 2006, a major civil exercise involving over 2,000 personnel from 22 government agencies, codenamed Exercise Northstar V, simulating bombing and chemical attacks at Dhoby Ghaut, Toa Payoh, Raffles Place and Marina Bay MRT stations was conducted. Thirteen stations were closed as a result of this and about 3,400 commuters were affected during the three-hour exercise.

Security concerns were brought up by the public when two incidents of vandalism at train depots occurred within two years. In both incidents, graffiti on the affected trains were discovered after they entered revenue service. The first incident occurred on May 17, 2010. This involved a breach in the perimeter fence of Changi Depot and resulted in the imprisonment and caning of a Swiss citizen, and an Interpol arrest warrant for his accomplice. The train involved was set 047/048, a C151 train. SMRT Corporation received a total of S$50,000 as fine by the Land Transport Authority for the first security breach. Thereafter, enough security measures were put in place by the Public Transport Security Committee to enhance depot security in light of the first incident, but works were yet to be completed by SMRT Corporation when the second incident occurred at Bishan Depot, on August 17, 2011.

On November 22, 2012, the Land Transport Authority carried out a ground deployment exercise with SMRT to test their incident management plans in the event of a train service disruption. In total, about 135 personnel including representatives from the Singapore Police Force’s Transport Command (TransCom) and SBS Transit participated in the exercise. Train service continued as per normal and commuters were not affected by the exercise. Codenamed ‘Exercise Greyhound’, the exercise went through the scenario of a broken rail on the East West line at Buona Vista. SMRT had also activated their Rail Incident Management Plan.

On 22 August 2013, ‘Exercise Greyhound 2013’ was carried out by the Land Transport Authority with SBS Transit to validate the procedures of SBST’s Operations Control Centre (OCC) and the workability of its contingency plans for bus bridging, free bus service and deployment of Goodwill Ambassadors (GAs) during a simulated prolonged train service disruption. About 300 personnel including representatives from SBST, LTA, SMRT, and the Singapore Police Force’s Transport Command (TransCom), Traffic Police and Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) participated in the exercise. Train service continued as per normal and commuters were not affected by the exercise.

Rolling stock

Presently, all MRT lines run with trains that are of fixed-length between three and six cars, with the Thomson-East Coast line using four cars. Since the conception of MRT lines in 1987, all train lines have been powered by the normal 750 volts DC third rail, while the North East Line is powered by overhead lines of 1500 volt DC. The East-West and North South lines use an automatic train operation system that is similar to London Underground’s Victoria line.

Since the incorporation of the MRT System in 1987, no rolling stock has been completely scrapped till date with the oldest C151 trains operating since service began. Here is a breakdown of the rolling stock of the network:

The C151 is under the North South line. It has a total number of 400 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It is powered with a 750V DC third rail having a speed limit of 80 km/h. The C151 is the first to commence service on November 7, 1987.

The C651 operates under the North South line having a total number of 114 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750V DC third rail. The C651 commenced service on May 2, 1995.

The C751B operates under the North South line and has a total number of 126 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750V DC third rail. The C651B commenced service on May 8, 2000.

The C151A operating under the North South line has a total number of 210 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750V DC third rail. The C151A commenced operation on May 27, 2011.

The C151B has a total number of 270 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750V DC third rail. It operates under the North South line and has been in service since April 16, 2017.

The C151C operating under the North South line has a total number of 72 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750V DC third rail. The C151C will kick off service in the year 2019.

The C751A operating under the North East line has a total number of 150 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 90 km/h and is powered with a 1500 V DC Overhead Catenary. The C751A is has been in service since June 20, 2003.

The C751C has been operating under the North South line since October 1, 2015. It has a total number of 72 cars with an average of 6 cars per train. The C751C has a speed limit of 90 km/h and then it is powered with a 1500 V DC Overhead Catenary.

The C830 operating under the Circle line has a total number of 120 cars with an average of 3 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 78 km/h and is powered with a 750 V DC Third Rail. The C151 is the first to commence service on 28 May 2009.

The C830C operating under the Circle line has a total number of 72 cars with an average of 3 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 78 km/h and is powered with a 750 V DC Third Rail. The C151 is the first to commence service on 26 June 2015.

The C951/C951A operating under the Downtown line has a total number of 276 cars with an average of 3 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750 V DC Third Rail. The C830C commenced service on December 22, 2013.

The C830C operating under the Thomson-East Coast line has a total number of 364 cars with an average of 4 cars per train. It has a speed limit of 80 km/h and is powered with a 750 V DC Third Rail. It is expected to commence services in 2019.

There is an active refurbishment scheme in which older trains have been renewed over the years. This is done in other to adhere to updated usability and safety codes as well as to enhance their lifespan. The refurbishment entails the following:

  • Improved passenger information systems
  • New trains sport sleeker designs
  • More grab poles
  • Spaces for wheelchairs
  • More space near the doors
  • Wider seats
  • CCTV cameras

The contracts of all trains are carried out by open tender, of which their contract numbers form the most recognized name of the stock. Occasionally, some official sources refer to the trains of the East West lines and North South as numbered generation trains, with the C151 train being the first while the C151C train being the sixth generation.

In addition, recorded announcements are frequently made to remind passengers to report suspicious activity and not to leave their belongings unattended. Lots of digital closed-circuit cameras (CCTV) have been upgraded with recording-capability at all stations and trains operated by SMRT Corporation. Also, trash bins and mailboxes have been removed from station platforms and concourse levels to station entrances. This is meant to eliminate the risk of bombs planted in them. Photography without permission was also banned in all MRT stations since the Madrid bombings, but it was not in the official statement in any public transport security reviews.

On April 14, 2005, the Singapore Police Force announced plans to step up rail security by establishing a specialized security unit for public transport. The unit is known today as the Public Transport Security Command or more commonly called the TRANSCOM. These armed officers began overt patrols on the MRT and LRT systems on August 15, 2005, conducting random patrols in pairs in and around rail stations and within trains. They are trained and authorized to use their firearms at their discretion, including deadly force if deemed necessary. On January 8, 2006, a major civil exercise involving over 2,000 personnel from 22 government agencies, codenamed Exercise Northstar V, simulating bombing and chemical attacks at Dhoby Ghaut, Toa Payoh, Raffles Place and Marina Bay MRT stations was conducted. Thirteen stations were closed as a result of this and about 3,400 commuters were affected during the three-hour exercise.

Security concerns were brought up by the public when two incidents of vandalism at train depots occurred within two years. In both incidents, graffiti on the affected trains were discovered after they entered revenue service. The first incident occurred on May 17, 2010. This involved a breach in the perimeter fence of Changi Depot and resulted in the imprisonment and caning of a Swiss citizen, and an Interpol arrest warrant for his accomplice. The train involved was set 047/048, a C151 train. SMRT Corporation received a total of S$50,000 as fine by the Land Transport Authority for the first security breach. Thereafter, enough security measures were put in place by the Public Transport Security Committee to enhance depot security in light of the first incident, but works were yet to be completed by SMRT Corporation when the second incident occurred at Bishan Depot, on August 17, 2011.

On November 22, 2012, the Land Transport Authority carried out a ground deployment exercise with SMRT to test their incident management plans in the event of a train service disruption. In total, about 135 personnel including representatives from the Singapore Police Force’s Transport Command (TransCom) and SBS Transit participated in the exercise. Train service continued as per normal and commuters were not affected by the exercise. Codenamed ‘Exercise Greyhound’, the exercise went through the scenario of a broken rail on the East West line at Buona Vista. SMRT had also activated their Rail Incident Management Plan.

On 22 August 2013, ‘Exercise Greyhound 2013’ was carried out by the Land Transport Authority with SBS Transit to validate the procedures of SBST’s Operations Control Centre (OCC) and the workability of its contingency plans for bus bridging, free bus service and deployment of Goodwill Ambassadors (GAs) during a simulated prolonged train service disruption. About 300 personnel including representatives from SBST, LTA, SMRT, and the Singapore Police Force’s Transport Command (TransCom), Traffic Police and Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) participated in the exercise. Train service continued as per normal and commuters were not affected by the exercise.

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